The Latest

We are beyond excited to announce our second print issue ever I live for that! is coming this spring. 
To celebrate, anyone who pre-orders this issue in the next five days (before midnight on Sunday March 16th) will be automatically entered to win a $500 gift card to Neiman Marcus. 
ORDER HERE!
In our second print issue themes of LGBT*LOVE are explored by voices and artists from across the United States and Africa, with a focus on Cape Town and New York City. For the first time, Interrupt has two guest editors - HolaAfrica & Project SOL. Both are active collectives and both brought unique lenses to LGBT*LOVE storytelling. They will take you inside a Kiki Ball on 135th street in Harlem, a trans youth photo shoot in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, a living room in Manhattan where senior lesbians reflected on their youth, a bedroom in Cape Town where queer women of color celebrated the beauty and erotica in their relationships, and portraits of religious LGBT youth across continents. 
Mar 11, 2014 / 58 notes

We are beyond excited to announce our second print issue ever I live for that! is coming this spring. 

To celebrate, anyone who pre-orders this issue in the next five days (before midnight on Sunday March 16th) will be automatically entered to win a $500 gift card to Neiman Marcus. 

ORDER HERE!

In our second print issue themes of LGBT*LOVE are explored by voices and artists from across the United States and Africa, with a focus on Cape Town and New York City. For the first time, Interrupt has two guest editors - HolaAfrica & Project SOL. Both are active collectives and both brought unique lenses to LGBT*LOVE storytelling. They will take you inside a Kiki Ball on 135th street in Harlem, a trans youth photo shoot in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, a living room in Manhattan where senior lesbians reflected on their youth, a bedroom in Cape Town where queer women of color celebrated the beauty and erotica in their relationships, and portraits of religious LGBT youth across continents. 

Everybody needs a purse, but why pay a ridiculous amount of money for something you can design and create yourself?  Contributor Annie Lipyeat makes her own purses for birthday and Christmas presents, and she has shared her guide on How to Make a Zip Purse on InterruptMag.com
Feb 25, 2014 / 1 note

Everybody needs a purse, but why pay a ridiculous amount of money for something you can design and create yourself?  Contributor Annie Lipyeat makes her own purses for birthday and Christmas presents, and she has shared her guide on How to Make a Zip Purse on InterruptMag.com

Get the recipe for a Winter Salad with Roasted Beets and Balsamic Vinegar Glazeon InterruptMag.com!
Recipe and Photo by Marie C. 
Feb 25, 2014 / 2 notes

Get the recipe for a Winter Salad with Roasted Beets and Balsamic Vinegar Glazeon InterruptMag.com!

Recipe and Photo by Marie C. 

Korean Carrot Crunch Salad (featured on InterruptMag.com!)
4 big carrots1 tablespoon of rice vinegar1 tablespoon of sesame oil1/2 tablespoon of light soy sauce1 teaspoon of honey2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro1.2 inches of leek or 2 spring onions1 tablespoon sesame seeds1/2 of a green chili (not super strong)
Peel the carrots neatly. Mix the rice vinegar, sesame oil, soy sauce and honey.
Cut the chili in half and if you want to make it less spicy, remove the seeds. Chop it finely. Mix with the dressing.
Take your peeled carrots and start peeling them again. But this time you peel them right in to the bowl of dressing. Try to make long, nice slices by peeling the carrot for as long as you can.
Chop your leek or spring onion in small bits. Mix with the dressing and let it rest for 10 minutes.
Before serving, add chopped cilantro and sesame seeds.
Feb 25, 2014 / 3 notes

Korean Carrot Crunch Salad (featured on InterruptMag.com!)

4 big carrots
1 tablespoon of rice vinegar
1 tablespoon of sesame oil
1/2 tablespoon of light soy sauce
1 teaspoon of honey
2 tablespoons of chopped cilantro
1.2 inches of leek or 2 spring onions
1 tablespoon sesame seeds
1/2 of a green chili (not super strong)

  1. Peel the carrots neatly. Mix the rice vinegar, sesame oil, soy sauce and honey.
  2. Cut the chili in half and if you want to make it less spicy, remove the seeds. Chop it finely. Mix with the dressing.
  3. Take your peeled carrots and start peeling them again. But this time you peel them right in to the bowl of dressing. Try to make long, nice slices by peeling the carrot for as long as you can.
  4. Chop your leek or spring onion in small bits. Mix with the dressing and let it rest for 10 minutes.
  5. Before serving, add chopped cilantro and sesame seeds.
Feb 24, 2014 / 3 notes

DIY Girls Celebrate National Engineers Week

by Luz Rivas

It’s National Engineers Week and the DIY Girls started out the week by visiting the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History to learn how learn how technology is used to make interactive science exhibits. After the visit, the girls will work in small teams and focus on designing and building an exhibit of their own.

We also visited the Space Shuttle Endeavour at the California Science Center. The girls were amazed at how big the shuttle is and enjoyed learning more about it from the center’s curators and exhibits. They were so curious about how it was built and asked a lot of questions.

Sylvia told us she now wants to be an astronaut! Most of the other girls said they’d rather design and make the shuttle. These trips really help them make connections to the making and engineering we do three times a week at their school. 

How to Publish a Serial Story
by Irina Michaels
List of Supplies
Ideas
Willpower/or very appealing bribery
Perseverance
A Mostly Working Command of Grammar and Punctuation
How to Do It
1. Write. Assuming you’ve had a story idea at any point in your life that has interested you, there’s a pretty good chance the idea will still be there. Write it down. Important things to add include originality, conflict, resolution, and commas.
2. Edit. Then edit some more. You could do surface edits (grammar, spellcheck, etc.) by yourself, but you would benefit from someone else reading your story and giving their opinions on what can be improved. Actually applying their edits to your story/article/submission will help. Trust me. (Really. One time I had three different people read the same piece…for different objectives.)
3. Find an outlet. While you were writing the story, your main outlet for communication included a blank screen.  You’re probably going to want to show the story to more than a Word document. A local newspaper would be a good idea since they publish different things in order to fill up white space, but setting up a blog or finding a website that lets you publish your writing could work just as well.
4. Take it to the chopping block. If you want to publish a serial story, you have to cut up your work into bits and pieces. (Fun, right, after you worked to make it whole and complete? I know.) Some of the best places to do this would be at chapter breaks, or places that will make your readers feel like they are about to go jumping from a plane and need more of your story to act as a parachute right this second (aka cliffhanger).
5. Contact outlet from step number 3. Since you’ve (hopefully, hopefully) figured out a place / literary outlet to publish your serial story, you need to contact them. If you’re writing from a blog or website, you can skip this step. Otherwise, write to a contributing newspaper editor, website creator, or person along those lines. Be professional (very professional), mention why you think your serial story could be shown there, what your story is about, and give contact information.
6. Promote. If you’re writing from a blog or website, you need to promote. This could be done by using social media, coming up with a clever story or blog title, and word of mouth, as well as possible intriguing line or two from your story. Promotion in order to gain readers is crucial, and could lead to more opportunities and loyal readers.
7. Write more. If you’re using a serial story to get money, it may or may not work, depending on how you’ve published it, but if you keep writing, you will have more materials to use to your advantage and become -it’s true- a better writer. Also, by this time, your writing habit will either be ingrained or as addictive as your favorite dessert. Keep writing.
Feb 24, 2014 / 7 notes

How to Publish a Serial Story

by Irina Michaels

List of Supplies

  • Ideas
  • Willpower/or very appealing bribery
  • Perseverance
  • A Mostly Working Command of Grammar and Punctuation

How to Do It

1. Write. Assuming you’ve had a story idea at any point in your life that has interested you, there’s a pretty good chance the idea will still be there. Write it down. Important things to add include originality, conflict, resolution, and commas.

2. Edit. Then edit some more. You could do surface edits (grammar, spellcheck, etc.) by yourself, but you would benefit from someone else reading your story and giving their opinions on what can be improved. Actually applying their edits to your story/article/submission will help. Trust me. (Really. One time I had three different people read the same piece…for different objectives.)

3. Find an outlet. While you were writing the story, your main outlet for communication included a blank screen.  You’re probably going to want to show the story to more than a Word document. A local newspaper would be a good idea since they publish different things in order to fill up white space, but setting up a blog or finding a website that lets you publish your writing could work just as well.

4. Take it to the chopping block. If you want to publish a serial story, you have to cut up your work into bits and pieces. (Fun, right, after you worked to make it whole and complete? I know.) Some of the best places to do this would be at chapter breaks, or places that will make your readers feel like they are about to go jumping from a plane and need more of your story to act as a parachute right this second (aka cliffhanger).

5. Contact outlet from step number 3. Since you’ve (hopefully, hopefully) figured out a place / literary outlet to publish your serial story, you need to contact them. If you’re writing from a blog or website, you can skip this step. Otherwise, write to a contributing newspaper editor, website creator, or person along those lines. Be professional (very professional), mention why you think your serial story could be shown there, what your story is about, and give contact information.

6. Promote. If you’re writing from a blog or website, you need to promote. This could be done by using social media, coming up with a clever story or blog title, and word of mouth, as well as possible intriguing line or two from your story. Promotion in order to gain readers is crucial, and could lead to more opportunities and loyal readers.

7. Write more. If you’re using a serial story to get money, it may or may not work, depending on how you’ve published it, but if you keep writing, you will have more materials to use to your advantage and become -it’s true- a better writer. Also, by this time, your writing habit will either be ingrained or as addictive as your favorite dessert. Keep writing.

How to Make a Musky Wildflower Bouquet, a guide by Chelsea Fuss now on InterruptMag.com
Feb 19, 2014 / 54 notes

How to Make a Musky Wildflower Bouquet, a guide by Chelsea Fuss now on InterruptMag.com

Feb 19, 2014 / 3 notes

"For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved the flavor and aroma of baechoo kimchi, that quintessentially Korean spicy fermented cabbage. While known to many simply as “kimchi”, it is one of those foods that, like cilantro, tends to be a real palate polarizer: one either loves it or one simply can’t abide by it. I consider myself fortunate to be in the former category. The pungent aroma and spicy, slightly sea-salty and tangy taste always kicks my salivary glands into overdrive. While seated in front of the television watching a movie, I can eat an entire bottle of kimchi like some people munch on a bag of potato chips. In fact, I used to do exactly that until I realized just how big a bite out of my food budget my kimchi obsession was taking. Rather than continuing to buy pricey ready-made kimchi, I became determined to learn how to prepare and ferment my own."—Steven Brandt

Illustrations by Tiffany Lin

Get the DIY Kimchi Recipe HERE on InterruptMag.com

Sesame Avocado Watermelon Radish Salad
Total time: 5 minutes
2 medium watermelon radishes (3/4 pound) peeled and cut into thin slices
1 avocado peeled and sliced
1 cup of baby spinach or any other greens of your predilection
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
optional: 1 tea spoon of toasted sesame
1.  In a bowl, whisk together the oil, the soy sauce and the rice vinegar.
2.  Toss greens, radish, and avocado slices with the dressing.
3. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.
Recipe by Mathilde Cohen, Photograph by Marie C.
Feb 19, 2014 / 3 notes

Sesame Avocado Watermelon Radish Salad

Total time: 5 minutes

  • 2 medium watermelon radishes (3/4 pound) peeled and cut into thin slices
  • 1 avocado peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup of baby spinach or any other greens of your predilection
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • optional: 1 tea spoon of toasted sesame

1.  In a bowl, whisk together the oil, the soy sauce and the rice vinegar.

2.  Toss greens, radish, and avocado slices with the dressing.

3. Sprinkle with sesame seeds.

Recipe by Mathilde Cohen, Photograph by Marie C.

Feb 18, 2014 / 3 notes
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Feb 13, 2014 / 8 notes

Love tastes like Strawberries—a little tart, a little sweet, always better with chocolate.

Thoughts by Jessica.  Illustrations by Jay/Katie Eisenberg. Read the full story at InterruptMag.com

Feb 13, 2014 / 12 notes

Love—a precise calculation of the incalculable.

Thoughts by Jareline.  Illustration by Jay/Katie Eisenberg.  See the full story at InterruptMag.com