Interrupt Magazine
Archive
Message
Follow
Random
Back to top

(Source: amaalsdrifting)

oomkzine:

Mixtape Spotlight: Amaal Said

Amaal is a member of the Barbican Young Poets and Burn After Reading collectives. Her work explores the idea of home, identity and what war has meant for her family, among other things. She is an 18 year-old Danish-born Somali who currently resides in London, UK. She is working on her first poetry collection. you can find her on Tumblr and tweeting@amaalsaid.
Amaal will be performing at OOMK’s Mixtape Fundraiser this Saturday 3rd of May. 
Tickets are £8 and can be bought here.
facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/614863768597176/

oomkzine:

Mixtape Spotlight: Amaal Said

Amaal is a member of the Barbican Young Poets and Burn After Reading collectives. Her work explores the idea of home, identity and what war has meant for her family, among other things. She is an 18 year-old Danish-born Somali who currently resides in London, UK. She is working on her first poetry collection. you can find her on Tumblr and tweeting@amaalsaid.

Amaal will be performing at OOMK’s Mixtape Fundraiser this Saturday 3rd of May. 

Tickets are £8 and can be bought here.

facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/614863768597176/

sshaemermis:

boobs.

sshaemermis:

boobs.

This week Fariha is joined by Tonia and Hawa, the fierce ladies of Browntourage. They discuss muslim identity, their cool project #mashallah, the New York Times article about Shonda Rhimes, and POC & Privilege. Enjoy!

"The bindi for me symbolizes religion and heritage. It’s a symbol of strength and love. It defines me." - Krishna  

“I don’t really understand what the problem is, I’m only appreciating the culture.” - Mia

@sadkejawan continues the conversation around cultural appropriation vs. appreciation. See the full story here: http://sanaahamid.com/ and if you’d like to be photographed or  share your point of view, send her an email at sanaahamid92@yahoo.com.

browntourage:

Each year we think we are over it, but each year we see something cringeworthy. In a post-Coachella, mid fashion week, pre-Halloween world of embarrassing mishaps, we have answered the call by putting on our 17 tween dream voice, and writing a fun style quiz for everyone with carefree appropriating friends out there, or anyone who just wants to rep it right!
"Appropriation v. Appreciation: An Illustrated Style Guide" is part of our September issue with interruptmag and features amazing drawings by none other than mobaby. As always, we appreciate feedback so tell us what you think!
-> Full Style Guide!
-> Letter from the Editors

browntourage:

Each year we think we are over it, but each year we see something cringeworthy. In a post-Coachella, mid fashion week, pre-Halloween world of embarrassing mishaps, we have answered the call by putting on our 17 tween dream voice, and writing a fun style quiz for everyone with carefree appropriating friends out there, or anyone who just wants to rep it right!

"Appropriation v. Appreciation: An Illustrated Style Guide" is part of our September issue with interruptmag and features amazing drawings by none other than mobaby. As always, we appreciate feedback so tell us what you think!

-> Full Style Guide!

-> Letter from the Editors

lordeinc:

Uski Roti (Mani Kaul 1970)

lordeinc:

Uski Roti (Mani Kaul 1970)

lordeinc:

Nadine Ijewere
lordeinc:

Nadine Ijewere
Are you Interrupt’s Next Editor-in-Chief?

Interrupt Magazine is a non-hierarchical fashion magazine. We use fashion as a universal entry point to conversations and actions that dismantle oppressive mainstream constructions of gender, sex, race, power, and beauty. Each issue, we have a new editor-in-chief.

 Our goal is to co-create content that provokes change, inspires action, and builds a portfolio for the important change-makers in our generation. You can read our manifesto here.

 Are you the next editor of Interrupt?

The Process: We spend a month working closely with a creative who is sustainably engaged in the issue they wish to ‘interrupt’ - acting as their personal creative agency.

What does this look like? Each editor produces four pieces of intriguing, engaging, and original content with the Interrupt team - see the latest issue here. We help you conceptualize, communicate and execute your ideas to bring your cause/perspective/mission/aesthetic to it’s fullest potential; reaching as many viewers as possible. 

We interrupt mainstream media through physical interruptions, like this hashtag and wheatpasting campaign we did last week, viral videos like this one, popular photo series like this one, events, gallery shows, and more.

Oh, and we provide you with all the resources of a magazine! Think: the office space, the illustrators, the graphic designers, the photographers, and the filmmakers, plus a $500 stipend.

Here are a few ideas we are interested in Interrupting this season (we’re always up for new interpretations, crazy ideas, fresh perspectives - so, don’t stop here):

We like to work with editors who have cultivated communities around their work, bring a nuanced perspective to their issue, are passionate about storytelling, and excited to collaborate with our team. We love investing in first time content creators so don’t feel intimidated if you’ve never been published!

So, are you in? Fill out the application here by September 29th so we can get to work!

Interrupt is published by Space-Made, a Brooklyn based creative agency that works to resource and brand artists and activists working within the margins.

Interrupt Bag

cameroncrussellblog:

image

This Michael Kors bag full of feminist lit can be yours for only $5!

What is interrupt bag? It’s a raffle, it’s an ad campaign, it’s a provocative mash-up of high fashion and conscious literature. All proceeds fund Interrupt Mag, a non-hierarchical, anti consumerist, inclusive fashion…

cameroncrussellblog:

Sunday is the biggest climate march in history, join us in posting a video challenging your friends ‪#‎marchwithme‬

designer spotlight: Esra Canoğulları @8ulentina is a talented multimedia artist who’s work includes wearable art from the future. “I make garments that are recognizable in form but abstracted in use. I use non traditional materials and surface treatments to achieve minimal compositions that can be reconfigured on the body. All of my pieces are gender non specific and are activated through the wearer’s personalization and experimentation with the piece.”

<3 browntourage

Genesis on her laptop. See the full story here.
"It was mostly my fascination with technology that inspired me to do this photo shoot. Even though interacting with everyday devices can seem banal, it’s also beautiful. Throughout all of my photo work, I make a point of illustrating my personal style, which I call &#8220;diaspora looks&#8221; — it&#8217;s a mixture between East and the West, inspired by the aesthetics of diaspora communities living in the Western world. Technology plays an interesting part in that, and helps represent cross-cultural identity as pan-national, which makes this series look like it could have been shot anywhere — in South Asia, or the Middle East, or even Brooklyn.&#8221; - lordeinc

Genesis on her laptop. See the full story here.

"It was mostly my fascination with technology that inspired me to do this photo shoot. Even though interacting with everyday devices can seem banal, it’s also beautiful. Throughout all of my photo work, I make a point of illustrating my personal style, which I call “diaspora looks” — it’s a mixture between East and the West, inspired by the aesthetics of diaspora communities living in the Western world. Technology plays an interesting part in that, and helps represent cross-cultural identity as pan-national, which makes this series look like it could have been shot anywhere — in South Asia, or the Middle East, or even Brooklyn.” - lordeinc

(Source: lordeinc)