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hannahassebe:

Lupita looks flawless in any color

hannahassebe:

Lupita looks flawless in any color

We are beyond excited to announce our second print issue ever I live for that! is coming this spring. 
To celebrate, anyone who pre-orders this issue in the next five days (before midnight on Sunday March 16th) will be automatically entered to win a $500 gift card to Neiman Marcus. 
ORDER HERE!
In our second print issue themes of LGBT*LOVE are explored by voices and artists from across the United States and Africa, with a focus on Cape Town and New York City. For the first time, Interrupt has two guest editors - HolaAfrica & Project SOL. Both are active collectives and both brought unique lenses to LGBT*LOVE storytelling. They will take you inside a Kiki Ball on 135th street in Harlem, a trans youth photo shoot in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, a living room in Manhattan where senior lesbians reflected on their youth, a bedroom in Cape Town where queer women of color celebrated the beauty and erotica in their relationships, and portraits of religious LGBT youth across continents. 

We are beyond excited to announce our second print issue ever I live for that! is coming this spring. 

To celebrate, anyone who pre-orders this issue in the next five days (before midnight on Sunday March 16th) will be automatically entered to win a $500 gift card to Neiman Marcus. 

ORDER HERE!

In our second print issue themes of LGBT*LOVE are explored by voices and artists from across the United States and Africa, with a focus on Cape Town and New York City. For the first time, Interrupt has two guest editors - HolaAfrica & Project SOL. Both are active collectives and both brought unique lenses to LGBT*LOVE storytelling. They will take you inside a Kiki Ball on 135th street in Harlem, a trans youth photo shoot in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, a living room in Manhattan where senior lesbians reflected on their youth, a bedroom in Cape Town where queer women of color celebrated the beauty and erotica in their relationships, and portraits of religious LGBT youth across continents. 

How to Make a Musky Wildflower Bouquet, a guide by Chelsea Fuss now on InterruptMag.com

How to Make a Musky Wildflower Bouquet, a guide by Chelsea Fuss now on InterruptMag.com

Love—a precise calculation of the incalculable.

Thoughts by Jareline.  Illustration by Jay/Katie Eisenberg.  See the full story at InterruptMag.com



"I find it’s much more fruitful to ask questions about a person’s work. Honor their career by asking how they got where they are (in a non-patronizing way, not by asking ‘What are you doing here?’) Often times, over the course of answering that question, they will tell you about how racism/sexism/homophobia/transphobia have impacted their lives and shaped their opportunities, which is really a much more interesting conversation than ‘So what’s it like being an exotic other?’ anyway.”
—Nia King, “Interviewing People Who Are Not Like You”
Artist/Activist/Podcast Extraordinaire/General Awesome Person Art Activist Nia lays it out in “Interviewing People Who Are Not Like You"—providing thoughtful tips and a set of practice questions to get you started.Get the foundation of solid interviewing skills and check out Nia’s piece, now featured on Interrupt

"I find it’s much more fruitful to ask questions about a person’s work. Honor their career by asking how they got where they are (in a non-patronizing way, not by asking ‘What are you doing here?’) Often times, over the course of answering that question, they will tell you about how racism/sexism/homophobia/transphobia have impacted their lives and shaped their opportunities, which is really a much more interesting conversation than ‘So what’s it like being an exotic other?’ anyway.”

Nia King, “Interviewing People Who Are Not Like You

Artist/Activist/Podcast Extraordinaire/General Awesome Person Art Activist Nia lays it out in “Interviewing People Who Are Not Like You"—providing thoughtful tips and a set of practice questions to get you started.

Get the foundation of solid interviewing skills and check out Nia’s piece, now featured on Interrupt

Excerpts from “How To Not Be Creepy On Twitter" by Sarah (@writehandedgirl)

Artwork by HXNNXH

1. Before you even send a tweet to someone, consider your relationship with them carefully. This is especially important if it’s a DM, which is immediately more private and personal. Have you met IRL? How long have you followed each other? What sort of things do you discuss? Does she/he actively respond in conversation with you? Is he/she in a different position of power to you (for example, you’re an older man she hasn’t met, and she’s a younger woman?). What dynamics are driving the conversation?

2. People will make comments about their own bodies on Twitter. They will use nice pictures of themselves in their avatars. This is not necessarily an invitation for you to comment on their physical appearance.

Example: One day I tweeted: “I wore short shorts today, and anyone who judged my scars [on my thighs, from self-injury] can kiss my ass.”

I got many male responses regarding my ass, and the act of kissing it.

Creepy. Not OK. NOT the point of the tweet.

3. It’s usually a good rule of thumb to avoid commenting on someone’s physical appearance, unless in response to a direct question – ie ‘Is this dress right for this occasion?’ or ‘What do you think of my new haircut?’ Even then, ask yourself how they might feel about your reply, and if you do choose to comment, focus on the question and be polite.

4. Be considerate of your use of endearments, unless it’s someone you know really well. Again, consider the dynamic. Two women who’ve been tweeting each other for a few months using “hun”? cool. Any other sort of unsolicited over familiarity or affection to someone you don’t know? – NO.

5. If the conversation starts in public, don’t move to DM without checking if that’s ok. In fact, any use of DM needs to be considered very carefully. It’s the equivalent of talking to someone at a party, then moving them into an empty room and closing the door. Do they want you to do this? Are you sure?

6. If you publicly offend someone and they call you out on it – publicly apologize.

7. Replying to things that were tweeted several days ago will indicate to people that you’ve been stalking their timeline. This is probably going to make them feel uncomfortable.

8. Don’t ask for personal details like addresses. You can do this only if you know them well, if you request the information publicly and allow them to reply privately, and if you are happy with the request being turned down.

9. DON’T FAV OR REPLY TO EVERY SINGLE TWEET FROM ONE PERSON. Seriously, it’s not cute, it’s creepy.

10. If you constantly reply to a person, and they constantly do not acknowledge you (particularly if they don’t follow you, either) – that probably means they don’t want to interact with you. Let it go.

11. Don’t ‘White Knight’ if you see a woman having an argument with a man. We’re strong women. Most of us are very well rehearsed in these sorts of conversations. We don’t need you to jump in and save us. (Caveat- see comment below regarding extremely abusive behavior).

12. There are very, very few situations where it’s going to be ok to proposition someone on Twitter, so you can probably safely assume that your situation is one of the Not Ok ones. Don’t do it.

13. If you don’t know what constitutes creepy, you may not know what constitutes harassment or abuse. In some cases it can be a pretty fine line. Again, think before you tweet. You might not just make someone uncomfortable – you might be seriously crossing that line.

Reflections on the past, present, and future of the LGBT community.

"My parents took in gay people from the street who were hurt during the Stone Wall Riots."

"I used to drink everyday and then I just stopped."

"I had a great career in publishing – you should try it."

"My first girlfriend and my last girlfriend are here in this room."

"I just want to clarify something, I was never fully out until my late 60s."

"My partner and I got married two weeks ago."

"Today is absolutely the best time to be gay."

"Parents throwaway kids they don’t want by sending them to live in New York City."

"I started talking to my family again around 2000."

"The trans young people we see at The Center have good style.”

"Trans men are replacing butch."

"In some ways, I can’t imagine what it is like to be young today."

Excerpts from Celebrate Every Now & Thenon Interrupt Magazine

Photos by Nyra Lang

Early in transition, the mental gap I had to bridge between the naked body of my cisgender girlfriend and my own naked body pushed me over the waterfall of dysphoria whenever physical intimacy happened. Internalized transphobia and cissexism is really hard to overcome. Seeing her naked body reminded me of how wrong my own felt to me. But with a trans woman, it’s different. She tells me, “I will only touch you in ways you want to be touched.” My body is a minefield and if you step the wrong way we both might get blown up. She understands. She is patient as I translate the map to my body and help her avoid the landmines. And that means the world to me. She understands that on some days the dysphoria is so bad that the only thing I need is to be held.”

Read Teagan Widmer’s “Creating Magic Together" trans partners and intimacy on InterruptMag.com

(Illustrations by Ellie Knrich)

“I came out to myself. 20 years old, in a whirlwind year which I titled, myself, the most insignificant year of one’s life. I was wrong. I was so wrong. That year was the most significant for me. I came out. I came out to myself.”
—By Mantis, The (Wo)menstrual Cycle
Image by HXNNXH
Read the entire story at Interrupt Mag

I came out to myself. 20 years old, in a whirlwind year which I titled, myself, the most insignificant year of one’s life. I was wrong. I was so wrong. That year was the most significant for me. I came out. I came out to myself.”

By Mantis, The (Wo)menstrual Cycle

Image by HXNNXH

Read the entire story at Interrupt Mag

"It’s Okay to Love Me"

“It’s okay to love me,” is a phrase Olympia Perez, 23, never wants to say. She transitioned to female a few years ago. She is bored by the stigma around dating trans people.

To people who fear being in a relationship with her because they don’t understand transgender people she wants to yell: “It’s okay to love me!”

To those who feel by dating her they are a champion for transgender rights, someone to be admired and applauded, she wants to give them the side-eye and say, “It’s okay to love me…”

Photos by Laurel Golio


Interrupt Magazine and The Big Bad Lab present:
It’s OK to Love Me
[Trans* Photo Shoot] 

This photo shoot is open to people of all ages who identify as trans and want to eliminate stigma surrounding loving and being in love with them.Feel free to send this invite to anyone you know in the NYC area might be interested.Shot by photographer Laurel Golio.Monday, October 28, 2013 from 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM544 Park Ave. Unit 605
Brooklyn, NY  

To RSVP please text TXTRSVP OK2LOVE to 313131or drop-in anytime between 2PM-5:30pm


Directions:
Take the G-Train to the Myrtle-Wiloughby St stop. 
Cross streets: Nostrand Ave & Park Ave. 
It’s a big gray building on the corner of Nostrand Ave.
 

Questions or Inquiries
Twitter: @interrupt_mag 
Facebook Page: InterruptMag
Or email us: submit@interruptmag.com

Interrupt Magazine and The Big Bad Lab present:

It’s OK to Love Me
[Trans* Photo Shoot] 
This photo shoot is open to people of all ages who identify as trans and want to eliminate stigma surrounding loving and being in love with them.
Feel free to send this invite to anyone you know in the NYC area might be interested.
Shot by photographer Laurel Golio.


Monday, October 28, 2013 from 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM
544 Park Ave. Unit 605
Brooklyn, NY 
 
To RSVP please text TXTRSVP OK2LOVE to 313131
or drop-in anytime between 2PM-5:30pm
Directions:
Take the G-Train to the Myrtle-Wiloughby St stop. 
Cross streets: Nostrand Ave & Park Ave. 
It’s a big gray building on the corner of Nostrand Ave.
 
Questions or Inquiries
Twitter: @interrupt_mag 
Facebook Page: InterruptMag
Or email us: submit@interruptmag.com

samtastically-samazing said: HI! I've been trying to get the link to be able to submit something for the LGBT issue and can not find the link. Could you please help me out?!

You can email your submission to SUBMIT @ INTERRUPTMAG.COM ! And you can visit our submit page at http://interruptmag.com/?page_id=63

Can’t wait to see your submission :D

If you’re a white feminist and you were surprised or you felt defensive or you think you’re not part of the problem, then now is the time to woman up, rethink your own role and help reshape feminism. Here’s how:

1. Recognize that even when your good intentions are truly good, that’s totally meaningless. 

2. If you feel defensive when talking about race with a woman of color or reading about race in a piece written by a woman of color, assume the other person is saying something especially true. 

3. Look for ways that you are racist, rather than ways to prove you’re not.

4. Listen to people of color, even if you don’t know many.

5. Use your feminist powers to identify instances when people of color are under-represented or misrepresented, and speak out about it. 

Read more here!

Written by Sarah Milstein